Laura’s Psychology Blog

One Professor’s Observations of the World of Psychology….   

May 23, 2014

readings in psychology for 23 May 2014 in Psychology #psychology #aps14sf #glass #PsychScience

We're at APS all week, come by and test drive Google Glass!... come by the Cengage booth if you can't make these activities... we'll tweet out the times!

We’re at APS all week, come by and test drive Google Glass!… come by the Cengage booth if you can’t make these activities… we’ll tweet out the times!

Here’s what we are reading today:

“It’s well known that people marry folks who are like them,” said Benjamin Domingue, lead author of the paper and a research associate at CU-Boulder’s Institute of Behavioral Science. “But there’s been a question about whether we mate at random with respect to genetics.”

For the study, Domingue and his colleagues, including CU-Boulder Associate Professor Jason Boardman, used genomic data collected by the Health and Retirement Study, which is sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.”

“The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that the number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease will increase from 5 million in 2014 to as many as 16 million by 2050. Memory impairments and other early symptoms of Alzheimer’s are often difficult to differentiate from the effects of normal aging, making it hard for doctors to recommend treatment for those affected until the disease has progressed substantial…”

 

The 'other doctor Freberg" is Karen Freberg an assistant professor of social media at the university of Louisville. Poor Karen, after demonstrating Google Glass all day, she took a three hour nap! Not to worry, she's ready to go today!!

The ‘other doctor Freberg” is Karen Freberg an assistant professor of social media at the university of Louisville. Poor Karen, after demonstrating Google Glass all day, she took a three hour nap! Not to worry, she’s ready to go today!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Our results can be interpreted two ways,” said Rebecca Knickmeyer, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry in the UNC School of Medicine and lead author of the study published May 19 in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. “Either SSRIs increase risk for Chiari type 1 malformations, or other factors associated with SSRI treatment during pregnancy, such as severity of depression itself, increase risk. Additional research into the effects of depression during pregnancy, with and without antidepressant treatment is urgently needed.”

“In a study published in the Journal of Memory and Language, Michael Vitevitch, KU professor of psychology, showed that research participants recognized these keywords more quickly and accurately than other words that were like the keywords in many respects except for their position in a network of 20,000 similar-sounding English words that he and colleagues created in 2008.”

“Looking at the activity of just one neuron in the brain doesn’t tell you how that information is being computed; for that, you need to know what upstream neurons are doing. And to understand what the activity of a given neuron means, you have to be able to see what downstream neurons are doing,” says Ed Boyden, an associate professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and one of the leaders of the research team. “In short, if you want to understand how information is being integrated from sensation all the way to action, you have to see the entire brain.”

“According to Marcus Raichle (2010), some of the earliest indications that the brain was not exactly quiet during daydreaming or mind wandering came from observations made by Hans Berger, inventor of the EEG, in 1929. Berger wrote that the brain seemed to be “in a state of considerable activity” all the time, and not just during active wakefulness.”

 

 

 

January 20, 2014

readings in psychology for 20 january 2014 @PsychScience

 

 

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 5.57.48 PMHere is what we are reading today:

“Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a new molecular mechanism by which cocaine alters the brain’s reward circuits and causes addiction. Published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Dr. Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD, and colleagues, the preclinical research reveals how an abundant enzyme and synaptic gene affect a key reward circuit in the brain, changing the ways genes are expressed in the nucleus accumbens. The DNA itself does not change, but its “mark” activates or represses certain genes encoding synaptic proteins within the DNA. The marks indicate epigenetic changes—changes made by enzymes—that alter the activity of the nucleus accumbens.”

“”Researchers tend to be either in a camp that believes the control of eating is all regulated from the top down, or from the bottom up,” said Ralph DiLeone, associate professor of psychiatry and neurobiology and senior author of the paper. “Both are important and this paper brings a little more neurobiological clarity to the question.””

“Sports teams take the field in a blinding array of color combinations. Nearly every color in the rainbow seems to be worn by someone. Is this just a matter of national pride or taste?

According to Hill and Barton (2005), individuals and teams competing in sport who wear red uniforms are more likely to win. What principles might be responsible for this phenomenon?”

“Prof Tim Spector, research collaborator and director of the TwinsUK study from King’s College London, said: “This is an exciting finding that shows that some components of foods that we consider unhealthy like chocolate or wine may contain some beneficial substances. If we can start to identify and separate these substances we can potentially improve healthy eating. There are many reasons including genetics why people prefer certain foods so we should be cautious until we test them properly in randomised trials and in people developing early diabetes.””

“”Alzheimer’s is a challenging disease that researchers have been approaching from all angles,” said Mohamed Naguib, M.D., the Cleveland Clinic physician who lead the study. “This discovery could provide us with a new approach for preventing and treating Alzheimer’s disease.””

“Gopikrishna Deshpande, an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in Auburn’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering, and the NIH researchers recently published their results in the journal, “Brain Connectivity.””

 

 

May 26, 2013

Research interview at APS #aps2013 #aps2013dc

 

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Here is our APS interview on our research!

Discussing “family” research partners!

 

 

January 17, 2012

UPDATES in Psychology for 17 January 2012

Click on the above to review our new book!

Here is what I am reading today:

“Scientists at Tokyo’s Yamazaki Gakuen University wondered why dogs do not seem to feel the cold in their paws, even though the paws have less insulating fur than their trunks. The paws have pads containing a high fat content, which freezes less easily than other tissues, but they also have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which means they should lose heat easily.”

“Dr. Adam Perkins, lead author of the study at the IoP at King’s says: ‘Our research group focuses on understanding the causes of anxiety. No one knows exactly what anxiety is. However many animal studies link it to risk assessment behaviour, suggesting anxiety can be explained as a defensive adaptation. We wanted to see if this was also the case in humans.’”

“One daughter in social media who knows how to get the word out!”
“Some 3,100 exhibitors attended the show, and although there were plenty of mainstream technologies on display, the show attracted a fair share of off-beat gadgets. Here’s a roundup of some of the weirdest devices:- SOLOWHEEL. Picture a unicycle without a frame or saddle, and you have the Solowheel. Not working for you? Ok, add this to the picture: footboards that fold out from the wheel. To ride it, you stand on the footboards and straddle the wheel. Lean forward, and the wheel engages a battery-powered electric motor that can send it -and hopefully its rider- zooming along at 10 miles per hour. The wheel has a gyroscope that helps keep the rider upright. In other words, it’s like a Segway with only one wheel.”

“College can be some of the best years of your life, but what happens after graduation? With the tough economy, increased costs of living and outsourcing of jobs, what’s a recent graduate to do?

We partnered with prominent blogger and author of Life After College, Jenny Blake, to develop a post-college decision making roadmap. Whether you live at home, are job hunting or not sure what to do with your life, it may be a good idea to start brainstorming and planning your future.”

“It’s common for people to pick up on each other’s movements. “This is the notion that when you’re having a conversation with somebody and you don’t care where your hands are, and the other person scratches their head, you scratch your head,” says Sasha Ondobaka of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour at Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands. He cowrote the paper with Floris P. de Lange, Michael Wiemers, and Harold Bekkering of Radboud and Roger D. Newman-Norlund of the University of South Carolina. This kind of mimicry is well-established, but Ondobaka and his colleagues suspected that what people mimic depends on their goals.”

“To find out why teens might be more prone to such maladies, the team started with the nucleus accumbens, a part of the brain that produces so-called happy chemicals in response to rewards such as food or sex. As many are aware, various chemicals (such as recreational drugs) can cause the same effect. In this study, the researchers taught a group of rats to respond to a tone by dipping their nose in a certain hole. Doing so resulted in a tasty treat. In the brain, the tone resulted in the production of happy chemicals which served as a reward, causing the rats to learn to do as they were bid. Both teens and adults made the same amount of the happy chemicals, but, when the researchers compared the reaction of another brain part, the dorsal striatum, to such chemicals in teen rats versus adults they found that this particular brain region responded with more activity in the teen rats.”

“Apple is scheduled to host an education-related event Jan. 19 — shrouded with a veil of mystery, as always. A new report from  Ars Technica says the company is about to unveil a set of tools to create interactive ebooks.

Previous rumors said Apple will show no new devices, and that the event will center around Apple’s new partnerships with textbook publishers.”

December 20, 2011

sharing happiness this season

Filed under: a current story,a Family Blog or 2 — Laura Freberg @ 1:08 pm

Our daughter Kristin and future son-in-law Scott

In the holiday season, we all should share some joy and happiness. My daughter Kristin is engaged to a wonderful man, Scott.

All the happiness to you.

Laura

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Quote to Ponder

It is not a lack of love,
but a lack of friendship
that makes unhappy marriages
-------- Nietzsche

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