Posts filed under: Teaching Psychology

Butterflies and Taste Aversion

I haven’t had much time in between working on my three books this year to post many original blogs, but I just couldn’t pass this up. One of the most important things I do during textbook revisions is fact check […]

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How Entitled Are Contemporary Students?

We professors hear quite a bit about students who feel “entitled.” Although most of us have a few war stories to tell, it seems like this is a small minority of students to me. However, the minority that engages in […]

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Eyes and Honesty

Our lives are becoming increasingly public and archived. Social psychologists have known for a long time that being watched can change the way people behave, but the concept of “being watched” might mean something very different in the age of Google […]

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Learning from Readers: Transillumination and Chun Guns

One of the amazing and fun things about having textbooks out there in this digital age is that you hear really interesting things from the professors and students using your books. In my email inbox today was a really nice […]

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Restoring Invisible and Abandoned Trials (RIAT) and Antidepressants

Good science is never defensive. No matter how strongly we believe something to be fact, we should always welcome challenges. Reports of scientists seeking to squash any alternate views, no matter how bizarre, sadden me. Debate gives us the opportunity […]

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