Posts filed under: neuroscience

DIY Trepanning?

Archaeologists have found skulls dating back as far as 7000 years that show evidence of trepanation (also known as trephining). A cut has been made in the skull. Some of the skulls show bone growth, suggesting that people were able […]

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Medicating ADHD

My students know that I have some major biases (I try to share these upfront), and in particular, I really don’t like the idea of medicating developing brains when alternative treatments are available. I am not a clinician, and I […]

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A Face Transplant Patient’s View of the Procedure

One of the more surprising things (to many students) we talk about in the context of the peripheral nervous system’s ability to reconnect is the transplanting of cadaver parts.  In my news today was an interesting interview with a woman […]

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Learning from Readers: Transillumination and Chun Guns

One of the amazing and fun things about having textbooks out there in this digital age is that you hear really interesting things from the professors and students using your books. In my email inbox today was a really nice […]

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Restoring Invisible and Abandoned Trials (RIAT) and Antidepressants

Good science is never defensive. No matter how strongly we believe something to be fact, we should always welcome challenges. Reports of scientists seeking to squash any alternate views, no matter how bizarre, sadden me. Debate gives us the opportunity […]

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